All About Symbian - Nokia (S60) and Sony Ericsson (UIQ) smartphones unwrapped

  #1  
Old 16-01-2003, 02:52 PM
TANKERx's Avatar
TANKERx TANKERx is offline
Prodigal Symbiant
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Bridgend, South Wales
Posts: 1,337
TANKERx is on a distinguished road
Everybody runs....

Not long ago, it was discovered that you can actually bypass the security on the Orange/Microsoft SPiV so that installing third party applications becomes a reality. If you bought one of these units with the intention of installing extra software, your dreams have come true - only keep looking over your shoulder because Microsoft and Orange are looking for you.......

So what is it with Microsoft? As reported here by The Register who sourced the information from here on C|Net, there is grave concern over the break in security, and understand this, that as part of The War Against Terrorism, hackers (that's you if you're evil enough to want to play Pacman on your dang phone), this is very serious.

Aren't you glad your phone uses an open OS (Symbian)? Heck, imagine if installing software rendered you a terrorist!

Quote:
Originally Posted by C|Net
The possibility of rogue software flooding through cell phone networks is among the worst fears that carriers have, said Alan Reiter, an analyst with consulting company Wireless Internet & Mobile Computing. Cell phone networks became vulnerable to such attacks when carriers began selling phones that can download software and games, ring tones and business tools became available for download, he said.
I don't understand this. Someone please explain. For how long have people been connecting to the internet over their mobile phones? Quite a few years by now - so what are they worried about?

Maybe this is typical of a company that isn't mature enough to know what it is doing. Like an old man who buys a TV and doesn't want to use the remote control (because the batteries may run out), Microsoft doesn't understand what it is doing and the market in which it is doing it.

Blame Orange? Maybe, but why? Orange haven't blocked people from installing software on Java enabled phones or smarter phones such as the 9210, 7650 or any other smart phone (and there are Telnet clients, FTP clients and web browsers available for them).

When you go for Microsoft, you are tying yourself down to a closed technology where you are a given a licence to use the phone. You think I'm going over the top? Where would this stop. First, they're telling you what you can put on your phone. Next, they'll be telling you that you use your phone in another country, not only will you have to pay roaming charges to the network, but you will have to pay Microsoft for an international license. Maybe you'll have to pay for a connection license if you want to dial up to certain types of ISP. Maybe you won't even be able to use a Microsoft Smartphone if you don't have a Passport account.

Is there any assurance that the people who have liberated their phones by applying the hack won't have their settings undone by the over-the-air firmware upgrade that the SPiV is advertised as being able to do? Of course, it will be up to them if they apply the upgrade or not, but since they don't own the phone, will they really have a choice?

Anyway, just a few thoughts. What do you think? Will Symbian go that way? Is there any indication of it? Is the proliferation of Symbian through different companies and manufacturers an assurance that it will always be the most open and friendly OS?

Remember the uproar there was iin the AAS forums when there was mention of Vodafone disabling the IrDA port so that users could only install software from the Vodafone web site? It turned out to be false (amen!), but let's spare a though for those SPiV users for whom our worst nightmare has become a reality!
__________________

TANKERx


Mobile Phone History
Nec D10
Ericsson i888 World -> N'7110 -> Sony J5e
N'9210 -> N'7650
SPV -> MPx200
N'6260 -> N'6680 -> N'N70 -> N'E61 -> N'N73

  #2  
Old 17-01-2003, 02:53 AM
GhostDog's Avatar
GhostDog GhostDog is offline
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Skopje,Macedonia
Posts: 6,356
GhostDog will become famous soon enough
I dont have much to say on this issue except: Lets hope Symbian doesn't follow the dreaded steps of Microsoft,for our sake.
In the worst scenario,we can start making our own phones.
Imagine OEM devices branded with the names of TANKERx and GhostDog runing some floppy linux distro
__________________
www.symbiandiaries.com/ghostdog



Please don't PM me with something that belongs in the forums.Search first,then ask.

  #3  
Old 17-01-2003, 01:20 PM
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Corporates

As I understand it, M$ are going for the corporate market & it is the corporates who are worried about rogueware circulating on the network.

The thing about using your phone to connect to the internet & download software is that in the past, the software has only been executed on some other device - say a PDA or PC. It is only now, with smartphones, that there is the possibility that some software from an untrusted source could be downloaded & executed on the phone itself, which could alter the functionality of the phone - i.e. a Trojan, or worse, a virus.

Perhaps they are acutely aware of the security failings in the whole PC architecture & are seeking to get off on a better footing with the M$ Smartphone platform.

I agree, it is bad to have the platform locked like that because it will stifle software development by the community. I'm just glad the Symbian platform is not similarly locked. In fact, I think, for the consumer, more should be done to encourage amateur programming (for example, the open source OPL programme).

However, I do think the platform should provide a way of locking it if this is desired, and for it to be impossible to be unlocked by the user. In other words, a company should be able to issue the phones to all their employees & (by doing some special thing between them & the carrier, to lock them) be sure that only the approved software can be used, thus assuring the integrity of the company data held on, & used by, the phone.

  #4  
Old 17-01-2003, 01:36 PM
TANKERx's Avatar
TANKERx TANKERx is offline
Prodigal Symbiant
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Bridgend, South Wales
Posts: 1,337
TANKERx is on a distinguished road
I agree to a point.

I think that locking is a good idea if you are a company who issues phones to employees, or if you are a parent who has bought a phone for your kid.

But what we have here is a corporation who decides for you whether or not you need to install a partiocular game. Sure, let a boss or a parent decide, it's they who have bought the phone.

Also, I suppose, let a manufacturer, network operator or OS provider do so, but make it clear to the purchaser that there are restrictions on what the phone can and will do;

Quote:
Originally Posted by Advertisment
Purchase this excellent Smartphone and play music, applications and games* wherever you are!



* Use of the handset for any purpose not expressly specified in the terms and conditions to which you agree by purchasing this phone may result in prosecution
__________________

TANKERx


Mobile Phone History
Nec D10
Ericsson i888 World -> N'7110 -> Sony J5e
N'9210 -> N'7650
SPV -> MPx200
N'6260 -> N'6680 -> N'N70 -> N'E61 -> N'N73
Ads
 

Bookmarks

Tags
runs

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
9210i runs Opera atakacs Nokia 9210 and 9290 1 17-04-2002 04:59 PM



All times are GMT. The time now is 06:55 PM.


vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Notes || Contact Us || Privacy Policy