All About Symbian - Nokia (S60) and Sony Ericsson (UIQ) smartphones unwrapped

Go Back   All About Symbian Forums > News and Comments > Links of Interest

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

  #16  
Old 25-10-2009, 03:36 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I've just been shopping, I've bought a HTC Tattoo with Android, an iPhone 3GS and an N97. They are all going to be test beds for a service I am developing, because of the massive number of Symbian out there, it cannot be ignored. But here is the rub, I will be buying four or five more Symbian phones to test properly. I will carry one per week and see which is best.

This, by the way, is the joy of below the line expenses.

  #17  
Old 26-10-2009, 09:11 AM
celios celios is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 471
celios is on a distinguished road
If Nokia spent less time on talk and analyst presentations put some of the saved effort into their devices, perhaps disasters like the N97 wouldn't be happening.

I look at the N97 and the Mini (you have to exclude the N900 from any comparison as it's not running Symbian) vs what's coming via Android in the next 2 months (Motorola Droid, HTC Desire, SonyEricsson X10) and there is no comparison. Android 1.5/2.0 seem to address many of the issues with 1.0 and now that battery life is improving, I can't see any competitive advantage for Symbian. The next 2-3 months will also see a slew of Android handsets aimed at the low-middle end, with PAYG options taking the fight to Nokia. With the iPhone competing at the top end and Android competing at all levels, they are about 6 months too late delivering a stable touch friendly UI.

I'm sure future versions of Symbian could be great. But that's little consolation for people using their N97/5800/etc for the last 5 months.

The problem Nokia are going to have going forward over the next 12 months is that many of the early adopters who are the typical customer for their flagship models are "once bitten, twice shy". I know I won't be spending anything North of 200 (SIM free) for a Nokia handset, and will be looking elsewhere for my Smartphones from now on.

  #18  
Old 26-10-2009, 10:42 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by celios View Post

I'm sure future versions of Symbian could be great. But that's little consolation for people using their N97/5800/etc for the last 5 months.
I don't really understand why consolation is necessary, as I've been using a 5800 since January and found it to be exceptional. I've played with and tried out alternatives, but none really work better for me. I keep looking, but at the moment there is nothing out there as good.

Even the much lauded phones out there have failed badly on signal strength as well as other fundametally important factors the Nokia always gets right. What use is a phone without a connection?

  #19  
Old 26-10-2009, 10:46 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I don't really understand why consolation is necessary, as I've been using a 5800 since January and found it to be exceptional. I've played with and tried out alternatives, but none really work better for me. I keep looking, but at the moment there is nothing out there as good.

Even the much lauded phones out there have failed badly on signal strength as well as other fundametally important factors the Nokia always gets right. What use is a phone without a connection?
Indeed the Internet forums are full of self-centred individuals who believe that their requirements are everybodys requirements and if they don't like something then nobody does. Some people will only be happy if Nokia custom-made phones to their personal requirements.

  #20  
Old 26-10-2009, 11:57 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
More sour grapes

From the guy who needs to get out more / get a date:

Quote:
BUT NOT IN A POSITIVE FASHION. One of the least sophisticated mobile countries in the world -the United States of America- who's vast population is so technically backwards and incapable of managing a modern smartphone
Nokia is a bad loser. Don't blame the market for rejecting your lousy user interfaces.

  #21  
Old 26-10-2009, 12:21 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
From the guy who needs to get out more / get a date:



Nokia is a bad loser. Don't blame the market for rejecting your lousy user interfaces.
Nokia is not a loser, it is a winner and still winning.

It's a bad winner though.

  #22  
Old 26-10-2009, 01:45 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
. But here is the rub, I will be buying four or five more Symbian phones to test properly.

This, by the way, is the joy of below the line expenses.
HUH? search for Remote Device Access Services from nokia - you can remotely test many devices virtually.

  #23  
Old 26-10-2009, 02:04 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
HUH? search for Remote Device Access Services from nokia - you can remotely test many devices virtually.
Really? Real time GPS signals and 3G connection quality? Real time location based testing? How do they do that?

  #24  
Old 26-10-2009, 05:00 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
[quote=quagmire;443639

Awesome post. Very insightful in terms of google. Would like to hear more![/QUOTE]

Someone questioned how and android phone is worth $100,000 to google....

Fundamental direct marketing. Yes you may only spend hundreds, or thousands with google checkout in any given year, but the data that you provide google is worth hundreds of thousands. Not only is your data used directly re-targeting you (Reading your e-mails on g-mail and targeting ads), but compliled, abstracted, aggregated that data is sold billions, if not trillions, of times for all those ad impressions. All those blog posts you make. All the sites you search, if google is your home page...every url you type into the address bar is tracked, not to mention the TCP/IP tracking. Grand central / wave transcribes every voicemail that is left... every number you dial, or dials you, gets a reverse append to a terrestrial (postal) address - you think your carrier is the only one who knows your postal address - think again, google now knows. Your wonderful Android phone now can be cell tri-angulate your position, turn on GPS, use Google maps and you become geo-coded.

Even if you have read the license agreement and are o.k. with being an open book to google, everyone who contacts you on your Android phone, sends an e-mail to your g-mail account gets data mined without their permission. You add friends to latitude, book mark places in maps... not only does google understand you better but will link that terrestrial address to a google profile (Remember that Amazon reciept sent to your g-mail account, with your postal address? google read that information).


So if you don't think that your Android phone is worth $100,000 check googles valuation, that doesn't come from people typing in search terms.
Ads

  #25  
Old 27-10-2009, 10:56 AM
A pedant
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
"To wet your appetite" should be "To whet your appetite".

  #26  
Old 28-10-2009, 06:45 AM
panpangege panpangege is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2
panpangege is on a distinguished road
Hi,Hi,Hi.

  #27  
Old 29-10-2009, 10:21 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I'm sorry guys. But some of this is just bull.

If it was really worth that much to them, they would give the phones away for free. Or even pay you to take/use them.

After all, they would then have 'sold' even more phones and so have made even more profit...

I like Google. They offer me lots of services for free. So they also make some money from this. So what? As long as the information they collect is non personal/non specific I don't care. As evil empires go, they look rather good to me

Oh and by the way. I do own an S60 phone (as well as a HTC Hero). Like the Hero, but the Nokia has better Camera and Video etc. and I need 2 phones. So like the Nokia as well...

Zuber

  #28  
Old 30-10-2009, 12:41 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Lightbulb The UI is the worst indicator!

What I find interesting is that everyone seems to be stuck on the UI. Lee's views on Google and the many UIs that are coming to Android is indicative of a general shallowness in the market at the moment. Many people will judge a device on the UI alone rather than on the whole package.

The N97 is considered a disaster by many because the UI isn't as pretty or as flashy as the Android or iPhone devices. Which is a pity. I have been using Symbian devices going back as far as the Nokia 7650 (which I still have and still works) through to the E90, E71 and currently the N97. I have also trialled the iPhone and the HTC Hero.

Once you start looking past the UI of the device, the capabilities of the iPhone are completely pathetic. Sure, you can jailbreak the device to achieve more with it (such as running multiple user apps or tethering) but thats a hassle and Apple actively develop against you doing that.

And the Android platform has a much tighter integration with Google's services, but relies heavily on those services for any semblance of true usefulness beyond being a "gadget." You don't have to jailbreak it, but if you remove Gmail, Google Calendar and so on, the phone suddenly loses a lot of core functionality that it really needs to be a true smartphone.

If you want to hate on a UI so much, consider that the WinMo interface, even in 6.5, is so bad that companies like HTC and Samsung (to name just a couple) have developed their own UI over the top of it to hide it. In fact, the WinMo interface substantially different from the WinCE I was running on an ancient Cassiopeia PDA in the mid 90s.

Symbian based devices, especially S60 based devices, are solid. Symbian has a very long genealogy and S60 is nearly 10 years old itself. And that is the ONLY thing that seems to hold it back for most modern phone "geeks." The fact that it is so old.

But there is not one thing in a Symbian based device that is lacking. Not one application that relies on another 3rd party for its functionality. Nor is there any doubt among anyone, even those who are very Android or iPhone favoured, that Symbian's multi tasking capabilities are still the best in the smartphone space.

Sure, the UI may not have the flash features that Android has. The widgets may not be quite as "pretty" on my N97 as they are on the HTC Hero. But does that really matter when my N97 is as easy and consistent to use as my E71? Anyone that has ever had any experience with any Nokia smartphone can pick up the N97 or the 5800 or the X6 or the E71 or the N85 or the E61 or the venerable N95 and know how to use it. The learning curve is very minimal because the UI is consistent across all devices.

Combine this with a solid feature set that is part of the device, but not dependent on any 3rd party (such as Google or Nokia themselves) for its functionality and this is why I still use Nokia devices even after using other platforms. I can access Google's services. I can access MS Exchange. I can use any number of mapping solutions with the GPS. I can access any email services with the device or with 3rd party software I install on the device. And if I really want to, I can do it all at the same time, in a manner that is very easy for me to navigate and very straight forward for anyone to use.

I'm not loving on Nokia or hating on Google or Apple. For me the point Lee is making, and that I'm trying to make also, is that openess is the core of the Symbian and S60 platform. Whatever the UI is, it does not define the long term success of a device or a family of devices. S60 has proven to be popular GLOBALLY, not just in the USA. And so far all we are really seeing in the USA from what has become the 2 primary USA smartphone platform developers has been a fancy UI, but limited user choice or capabilities.

----
/*
Yes, I do consider that Google and Apple have surpassed Microsoft as the USA's primary smartphone platform developers. Microsoft has done with WinMo what they did with Internet Explorer. It took Firefox to come along before Microsoft started working on Internet Explorer again, and its taken Google Android and the Apple iPhone to shake things up before they started putting any real effort into WinMo.

RIM/Blackberry is Canadian. Although some people tend to forget that fact. :-P
*/
 

Bookmarks

Tags
android, future, lee, plans, symbian, williams

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Psion plc benefits most from Symbian phones flying off shelves in Christmas rush. trickyt Community Waffle 6 28-11-2006 08:36 PM
Mobility Electronics first Symbian Office Partner. langdona Symbian OS News 5 10-08-2005 07:51 AM
Symbian Announce updated tools for OS 9.0 Ewan Symbian OS News 1 02-02-2005 01:11 PM
Symbian Partners Invest Another 50 Million Ewan Symbian OS News 2 07-07-2004 11:49 PM
Motorola and Symbian launch 2.5G and 3G reference designs Rafe Symbian OS News 0 18-02-2003 02:01 PM



All times are GMT. The time now is 08:38 PM.


vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright Notes || Contact Us || Privacy Policy