All About Symbian - Nokia (S60) and Sony Ericsson (UIQ) smartphones unwrapped

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  #1  
Old 11-07-2008, 03:12 PM
slitchfield slitchfield is offline
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Have you seen what budget phones can do now?

Owners of smartphones have long looked down on budget phones with the assumption that cheap means nasty. However, budget phones have developed in leaps and bounds lately, and Krisse argues that they may catch up with smartphones sooner than most people realise.

Read on in the full article.

  #2  
Old 11-07-2008, 03:34 PM
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Multitasking

It should be pointed out that most newer Sony Ericsson phones allow you to multitask as many midlets as you can fit into memory. It's not hard to run Opera Mini, GMail, Gizmo and toggle back and forth between them without any lag or slowdown.

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Old 11-07-2008, 03:49 PM
viipottaja viipottaja is offline
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The most interesting points of your article are right at the end. It will be interesting to see also how all the information (mostly completely insignificant, at least as individual snippets of data, video, pics) will be stored over the centuries and how historians will be using it. "You want see it - you'll be dead?" you say? No way, I will live forever of course, when Nokia moves into the "Eternal life and happiness business" around 2015.

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Old 11-07-2008, 04:03 PM
DevilsRejection DevilsRejection is offline
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Blast! I've been wanting to do this very same article, except with a 1680 for a while now. Nice job Krisse.

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Old 11-07-2008, 06:08 PM
ajck ajck is offline
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Great article Krisse, spot on. I'm posting a link to it on Forum Oxford.

Agreed, the phone will eat the smartphone, and as I've been saying for ages, eventually the personal computer (I've given up saying "laptop" because people misunderstand and say "the screen's too small" not realising the significance of TV Out). These are both very good things!

Alex
phonething.com
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2008, 08:18 PM
shoobe01 shoobe01 is offline
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Great article and a good point.

But I cannot get my head around how the s60 browser is better than Opera Mini. I use it only when needed (downloads), or because Google idle screen search fires it off.

  #7  
Old 12-07-2008, 01:11 AM
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Close but yet still far

You absolutely correct on this article. Many people do not get their phones because of may functions/features you can get on it, but for making calls. Nowadays people like getting online on their phones albeit just doing lilttle to moderate browsing. The new S40 ll bring many mid range phones close to what smartphones stand for right now. Smartphones ll always be far ahead of feature phones due to the recent developments in the smartphone worlds; Symbian and Andriod open source operating systems. To some extend hardware advancement is stagnating whereas software is getting more advance, which gives smartphones a big levarage on their robust architecture, scalability as the preferred platforms for most of these new services that ll be coming from vendors.

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Old 12-07-2008, 01:42 AM
sjhong sjhong is offline
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What's a smartphone and what's a budget phone? Without a definition, I believe this whole discussion falls short in its impact.

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Old 12-07-2008, 06:49 AM
svdwal svdwal is offline
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As long as there is enough money in smartphones (or whatever high-end phones will be called) there will be a smartphone device market.

Try argumenting the case using cars instead of phones and then explain why there are still expensive brands like Audi, BMW and Mercedes around. According to your argument, everybody should be driving some cheap Korean car. After all, both expensive and cheap cars have airbags, airco, power steering, ABS, a stereo and a rear seat that can be folded in parts.

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Old 12-07-2008, 09:47 AM
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The new opera mini 4.1 is excellent. It's my main browser nowadays, even for downloads. I use it to download The Smartphones Show(+-50mb). If normal feature phones come with it as standard, I think mobile web browsing will finally take off in a huge way.

  #11  
Old 12-07-2008, 09:57 AM
krisse krisse is offline
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Quote:
To some extend hardware advancement is stagnating whereas software is getting more advance
That's a very interesting point to make. It could be the reason Nokia is putting advanced web browsers in even their cheapest phones: they want to get people using their online services as quickly as possible.

Nokia itself is trying to become a software and online services company, and it's probably for the reason you just gave: hardware is stagnating while software (especially online software) is taking off.

Personally I'm quite surprised Apple is entering the phone hardware market right now, when they could make far more money in the long term entering the phone online services world. Imagine if Apple allowed other phone makers to include iTunes compatibility on their phones, that would earn them lots of very easy money from selling licences, and it would be more sustainable in the long term.


Quote:
What's a smartphone and what's a budget phone? Without a definition, I believe this whole discussion falls short in its impact.
Well, I assumed readers of AAS would know, but here's the definition I've always gone by: a smartphone can use native applications (programs that use the hardware directly, which Java doesn't). A smartphone also lets you switch between applications because it's multitasking.

But this particular discussion could apply to high end phones in general as much as smartphones.

The point I'm trying to make in the article is that the cheapest budget phones are catching up with the most expensive models far more quickly than people realise. What will happen when they do catch up?


Quote:
As long as there is enough money in smartphones (or whatever high-end phones will be called) there will be a smartphone device market.
Obviously if people carry on buying a product, the manufacturers will keep making it.

But at the moment the high end phone market mostly depends on high end phones doing things that budget phones can't. That would have to change if budget phones catch up with high end phones in functionality.




Quote:
Try argumenting the case using cars instead of phones and then explain why there are still expensive brands like Audi, BMW and Mercedes around. According to your argument, everybody should be driving some cheap Korean car. After all, both expensive and cheap cars have airbags, airco, power steering, ABS, a stereo and a rear seat that can be folded in parts.
I don't think cars are a good analogy for phones.

Korean cars are cheaper than German ones, that's true, but they're still not cheap by phone standards.

The very first mobiles cost thousands, but the latest budget models cost tens. In other words, modern mobile phones cost about 1% of the price of the first mobiles, and the prices are still going down.

That kind of drop has not happened with cars. In the car world, it would be the equivalent of a car dropping from 20,000 euros to 200 euros without any loss of quality or functionality.

If there WAS a car that cost 200 euros I suspect it would dominate the world market, but there isn't such a car yet.

A much better analogy is the pocket calculator, which used to be a high profile product that cost hundreds, but now is an everyday object that costs just a few euros.
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  #12  
Old 12-07-2008, 11:14 AM
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Thumbs up Good points, well made...

...particularly your last:

Quote: - If every phone has a high resolution screen, a TV Out feature, and compatibility with a keyboard and pointing device, will anyone bother buying standalone computers?

It was literally years before I ever īneededī to buy a īproperī computer. I cut my teeth with a Psion Series 3 and later a Series 5mx, using a travel modem and later a 6210/6310i to connect. Nowadays itīs still a close run thing as to wether I use my E90 or home PC more, although since the advent of the eeepc in my life, the lines have become a little more blurred.

Keep up the good work lads.

  #13  
Old 12-07-2008, 05:24 PM
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Phone Handset No native apps, yet

Feature phones like my partner's 6500 classic still can't do the most important thing I want: code, install and run native applications. But I do agree that feature wise they are getting close to what smartphones can do.

  #14  
Old 12-07-2008, 06:11 PM
krisse krisse is offline
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Quote:
Nowadays itīs still a close run thing as to wether I use my E90 or home PC more, although since the advent of the eeepc in my life, the lines have become a little more blurred.
One very interesting idea Nokia's Bochum labs were pursuing (just before they closed and moved) was of an N810 internet tablet connecting to a high definition television wirelessly.

If that feature ever appears in consumer products, you could just park yourself on the sofa and do computing stuff on your TV using a wireless keyboard and touchpad, with the phone or tablet doing all the actual computing while on a table or in a pocket. I think most people would prefer to do that than have a corner of their house dedicated to a PC.

You can see a video of the tablet-TV project (and others) here:

http://www.internettablettalk.com/20...ounds-project/
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  #15  
Old 12-07-2008, 10:44 PM
Williamoni Williamoni is offline
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Krisse

You make some good points as usual and thanks for highlighting how feature phones are catching smartphones up.

However, there are some flaws in your arguments. I agree with svdwal, who has given the argument using cars as the product. You don't accept this because cars are a lot more expensive than phones. That's true of course because the components necessary to make a car cost a lot more than the components necessary to make a phone. However, svdwal's point is still right -under your reasoning it doesn't make sense that everyone doesn't buy the cheapest car available to them, since they largely have similar functions. The fact is that people perceive differing performance levels, differing build qualities etc between the cars available and make choices accordingly.

There's no reason to believe that this will not happen with phones too.

You say that calculators are a better example. But the fact is that if I do buy the cheapest calculator available to me it does not have all the features that the most expensive calculator does. Yes it is true that the cost is much lower, but if I buy a one pound calculator in a Poundshop or whatever in the UK it will not be able to calculate sines and cosines for me. And this is after thirty years of these devices being available. Yet you seem to assume that even the cheapest phones will have the bells and whistles that the best smartphones have. In your example, calculators, this has not happened. And I don't think it will happen, fully, with phones either.

The other assumption you make is that if these tremendous extra functions are available to ordinary people, then these ordinary people will use them.

We can't assume that at all. Most of the people I know who aren't geeky will probably carry on in their own sweet ungeeky way and won't care that their phone can do a million things. They are happy to use it to make phone calls and not much else. They can't be bothered to even browse the web on a phone.

And by the way, I can't see the smartphone replacing the PC or laptop, even with TV out. If I'm on a train with some spreadsheet work to do how will TV out help me?
 

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