All About Symbian - Nokia (S60) and Sony Ericsson (UIQ) smartphones unwrapped

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Old 20-11-2007, 11:37 AM
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PHP to be added to Mobile Web Server

It has been informally announced that a PHP implementation is going to be added to Nokia's Mobile Web Server software. PHP is an open source scripting language usually used to create dynamic web pages. There will also a number of PHP extension modules that provide access to the core functionality of the phone. Read on for more thoughts.

Read on in the full article.

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Old 20-11-2007, 12:08 PM
cabbageshop cabbageshop is offline
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This is great. It also says mysql which is jst what I was wishing for when writing a python app a few months ago.

Having a proper database engine on a phone would be fantastic as long as it works with the phones limited resources.
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Old 20-11-2007, 04:39 PM
andrewgalpin andrewgalpin is offline
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this is great news! ive done alot of work with php scripts

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Old 20-11-2007, 05:10 PM
rbrunner rbrunner is offline
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Funny

In certain aspects, this is very funny: Run the Apache web server on the phone. This is not a small program, quite a heavyweight. On top of this, put the PHP script interpreter. Again, probably a multi-megabyte piece of code. On top of *this*, add web pages containing PHP scripts that do something. Now, in order to display something and not completely flying blind, take a true monster of a program, the S60 web browser, to "run the program".

For running a simple "Hello World" so-called "application" you probably fill up your phone memory with 30 megabytes or so from 3 big programs.

A native Symbian C++ "Hello World" program would not be much longer than the HTML and the PHP in the "Hello World" web page, and would probably come in at 2 or 3 KB, a whopping 10'000 times less, starting in a fraction of a second, faster than the Apache can deliver the web page if everything is already started-up.

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Last edited by rbrunner; 20-11-2007 at 05:29 PM.

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Old 21-11-2007, 01:46 AM
davidmaxwaterma davidmaxwaterma is offline
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my vision for this tech

Hi,

My vision for this tech is not as a server to 'the internet', whether that be via cell networks, wifi, or whatever.

No, the way I see this being exciting is having a web site visible over bluetooth.

This way, you can have a personal 'web' site visible to anyone within range. Imagine being in a train or bus.

Apart from letting people know something about you, it could be great for advertising or making an application or content available.

Of course, you might not want people knowing anything about you, but I think the same restrictions apply as to any personal web site.

Anyway, that's my tuppence worth.

Max.

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Old 21-11-2007, 07:00 AM
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No, the way I see this being exciting is having a web site visible over bluetooth.
...
This way, you can have a personal 'web' site visible to anyone within range. Imagine being in a train or bus.
That sorta exists already. In the open sourced version of the mobile web server, aka Raccoon, we have implemented what we call mobsite hopping. There we basically are able to map bluetooth device adresses to a corresponding URL.

That enables a couple of things. Firstly, having reached one mobsite, you can find other mobsites in the surroundings. That is, websites can implicitly be linked by physical proximity; they are somehow related because they happen to be in the same place. Secondly, it enables what you were thinking about, that is, being able to find mobsites that currently are around you.

The main difference from your case is that Bluetooth is only used for finding sites but the mobsites are still accessed over the Internet, which, depending on the viewpoint, is either a benefit or a drawback. From one point of view it's a benefit that having found an interesing site, you can still access it, even if you geographically move away from it. Furthermore, during the day you can "harvest" URLs of mobsites in your proximity that you only later check out. From another point of view it's a drawback that your site is accessible even after the one accessing it is no longer in your geographical proximity.

The problem of also using Bluetooth for accessing the site is that setting up a Bluetooth PAN is so darn difficult, if at all possible.

Johan

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Old 22-11-2007, 07:36 PM
jukkaeklund jukkaeklund is offline
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How about doing the "mobsite hopping" with WLAN & UPnP?

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Old 25-11-2007, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by jukkaeklund View Post
How about doing the "mobsite hopping" with WLAN & UPnP?
Unfortunately I don't really know enough about UPnP to be able to voice an intelligent opinion, but something similar surely could be achieved.

But it really depends upon what you actually want to accomplish. With mobsite hopping our primary intent was to provide linking by proximity since it's something that makes no sense at all in the context of regular servers, as they don't move.

So the assumption was that a mobsite has a global URL and the feature is to be able to find other mobsites in the physical proximity. Now, if you have devices connected to a WLAN, it does not necessarily follow that those devices have a global URL. In a NATed environment some might have, if they are connected to the MWS gateway. In a non-NATed environment they all might have, if, e.g., DynDNS is used for providing them with a global name.

If the WLAN basestation is not connected to the Internet, some devices might still have a global URL if they simultaneously are connected to the gateway over 3G. In that case those devices might be able to act as something like HTTP routers for devices in the WLAN that are not connected to the gateway.

But yes, using UPnP you should be able to make it possible to find other mobsites connected to the same WLAN. But it's not really the same thing, as the physical distance between the devices can be considerably larger in a WLAN context compared with the situation when you know they are within a Bluetooth distance from each other. And that's really the strength of Bluetooth - if you find a device using Bluetooth, you know that it's close by.

Johan
 

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